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Old 11-17-2004, 04:13 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Old 11-17-2004, 04:19 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Old 11-17-2004, 04:46 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Old 11-17-2004, 04:49 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Old 11-18-2004, 01:12 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Old 11-20-2004, 12:19 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Old 11-20-2004, 06:50 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Old 11-20-2004, 06:52 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Old 11-23-2004, 04:28 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Old 01-13-2005, 08:01 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Anybody here know of any EMS style programs for the BlackBerry. I ride on an ambulance squad, and some of us carry the pocket references, but thats one extra thing I have to carry. Im going to be carrying my blackberry on my side now (i used to, but the standard 7100t case actually didn't help, my blackberry fell out of the case when I jumped out the back of the rig at the hospital, luckily my crew chief saw the blackberry under the rig as we were leaving, i have a new case now that closes over the BB) and i'd like something where i can scroll through a list of the different medications so we know how to spell them as we write our run sheets. Things like that. Anything would be cool for EMS though.
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Old 01-13-2005, 08:20 AM   #11 (permalink)
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So basically an app with just a searchable (maybe by pressing the first letter of the name of the med), database that just lists names of medicines? Doesn't sound TOO hard to build something like that. Java programming isn't rocket science ;)
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Old 01-13-2005, 11:03 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I wish epocrates would port for BB, that'd be the BEST. I too have been looking for many things, including a drug database. If you're using it only for spelling, that wouldn't be too hard to do right now, I have a list of common meds I run into, such as nitro, lasix, asa, phenobarbytol, and many others I see almost daily on the volly squad, in a memo with a brief explination of what the drug does, how it interacts, and some metabolism information.

Best thing I can say is start something like that for now. I've emailed the epocrates people (they made a VERY in depth drug reference for the Palm OS.) but I haven't heard back if they will port for the BB or not. It was a nice program and I miss it when I migrated from palm to BB.

Hope some of this helps. Other then that, there are medical dictionaries you can purchase, but I haven't found a pharmecopia (sp?) yet for it.
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Old 01-13-2005, 12:21 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Maybe i'll write something that just lists the meds. Anybody have any quick how-to guides (i know wrong forum but its on the topic) on basically how to write a program that just lists things, where i can search by entering letters (kinda how the address book works) and then if i SELECT IT, it'll give me information on the med? I'll just copy everything from my handy dandy ALS Pocket guide into it, give me somin to do at work
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Old 01-13-2005, 01:17 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Depending on your development preference, you may also consider building it as a web app and accessing via your BB browser (or any web browser).

Write it in php/jsp/perl/asp and use an open source db like mysql (virtually all hosting accounts come with these as part of a standard package).

You will be at the mercy of your data connection (which may not be acceptable given your use case ;) ), but it may prove simpler to build and give you cross device capabilities (heck, build it and charge a subscription fee!).

Ryan
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Old 01-13-2005, 02:51 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I thought bout making a WAP app, but that whole thing about speed i don't like. It would take too long to get the spelling, im better off using the pocket reference i already have.

I design webpages for a living, i think i can manage making a wap page, lol, but dont wanna go that route.
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Old 01-13-2005, 03:43 PM   #16 (permalink)
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I ended up buying a program for $19.95 that has over 400+ medication names (brand, common, etc...) - its pretty good. I was scared bout the content they would have but they go into a HUGE amount of detail on every single drug. I looked up nitro and it told me all about nitro. What its for, what it does, who takes it, the correct dosage and the different methods it's taken. What to do after taking it. What pregnant females should do, etc... very very good so far. My only quirk is that since the list is huge, it sometimes is slightly delayed, and i can't just type my letters, i hafta scroll up and then delete the current word and type in a new word to scroll quickly. I can scroll up/down and hit space for next page at least:

http://www.beiks.com/rim/showprod.asp?prodid=502
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Old 01-13-2005, 04:07 PM   #17 (permalink)
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I love replying to myself, lol... here are some pictures of the program running:

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Old 01-14-2005, 09:46 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Nice find! I was looking at that awhile back, but didn't think it would suit my needs on the rig, but judging by the pictures you posted *runs off to grab my credit card* You just sold me! This beats my notepad method LOL!

Thanks!

Is it fast loading? Lets say I have a patient who is perscribed Nitro, they had chest pain, they are also perscribed a blood thinner (pick one, really doesn't matter), now nitro and most thinners will drop BP well below 90 diastolic, patient is going into volemic shock, will I be able to pull up the med he's taking and see if maybe the med and nitro have adverse reactions? Or is it better suited for times when you have a bit of play time to thumb through?

Thanks again! I bought it, but was curious before I got home and loaded it up.
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Old 01-14-2005, 10:37 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Well my main use is for spelling of meds. But it does give you details on each med. And some of the popular ones, like nitro, they REALLLLLLLLLLY go into full detail. BTW you meant systolic i hope over 100 (national, but in NJ we use 120 off-line medical order if they are prescribed and have their own nitro) to administer nitro to a patient. Let me paste what the program wrote on nitro:

nitroglycerin

GENERIC NAME: nitroglycerin

BRAND NAME: Nitro-Bid; Nitro-Dur; Nitrostat; Transderm-Nitro; Minitran; Deponit; Nitrol

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Nitroglycerin is a vasodilator (a medication that dilates blood vessels) that frequently is used in the management of angina pectoris. Synthesized in 1846, nitroglycerin was first used to treat anginal attacks in 1879. It was granted FDA approval in 1938.

Blood returning from the body in the veins must be pumped by the heart through the lungs and into the arteries against the high pressure in the arteries. In order to accomplish this work, the heart's muscle must produce and use energy ("fuel"). The production of energy requires oxygen. Angina pectoris (angina) or "heart pain" is due to an inadequate flow of blood (and oxygen) to the muscle of the heart. It is believed that all nitrates, including nitroglycerin, correct the imbalance between the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart and the work that the heart must do by dilating the arteries and veins in the body. Dilation of the veins reduces the amount of blood that returns to the heart that must be pumped. Dilation of the arteries lowers the pressure in the arteries against which the heart must pump. As a consequence, the heart works less and requires less blood and oxygen.

Additionally, in patients with angina, nitroglycerin preferentially dilates blood vessels that supply the areas of the heart where there is not enough oxygen, thereby delivering oxygen to the heart tissue that needs it most.

PRESCRIPTION: yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes (for some dosage forms)

PREPARATIONS: extended-release capsules containing 2.5, 6.5, 9, or 13 mg; 2% ointment with tape for application; patches (or transdermal delivery systems) which deliver 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 mg of nitroglycerin per hour; buccal tablets containing 1, 2, or 3 mg of nitroglycerin in an extended-release formulation; a translingual spray which delivers 0.4 mg of nitroglycerin per spray; sublingual tablets containing 0.15 or 0.3mg.

STORAGE: All formulations should be kept at room temperature, 15-30C (59-86F). The sublingual tablets are especially susceptible to moisture. They should NOT be kept in bathrooms or kitchens because of the higher degrees of moisture there. Care should be taken to replace the sublingual tablets every six months.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Nitroglycerin is indicated for the acute treatment and prevention of angina.

DOSING: For the treatment of acute angina attacks or for acute prevention (i.e. immediately before encountering situations likely to bring on an anginal attack): one tablet is allowed to dissolve under the tongue or in the buccal pouch (between the cheek and gums), or one spray is given of the lingual spray. (Nitroglycerin for sublingual or buccal use as well as spray are rapidly absorbed from the lining of the mouth for immediate effects.) This may be repeated every 5 minutes as needed. If angina is not relieved after a total of 3 doses, the patient should be taken to a hospital or a physician should be contacted. If lingual spray is used, the canister of spray should not be shaken prior to use, and it should be sprayed onto or under the tongue and then the mouth closed.

For prevention of angina, ointment may be applied using special dose-measuring application papers provided with the ointment. The appropriate amount of ointment is squeezed as a thin layer onto the paper, and the paper is used to spread the ointment onto nonhairy area of skin. The ointment should not be allowed to come into contact with the hands so that there is no absorption from the hands. Transdermal patches also are used for prevention. Patches may be applied to any hairless site but should not be applied to areas with cuts or calluses. Firm pressure should be used over the patch to ensure contact with the skin. The patch should not be cut or trimmed. Patches are waterproof and should not be affected by showering or bathing. Capsules of long-acting nitroglycerin also are used for prevention. They usually are prescribed 2 to 3 times per day and are taken 1 to 2 hours after a meal.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Since nitroglycerin can cause hypotension (low blood pressure), other medications which also cause hypotension may produce an unwanted additive effect. Such drugs might include medicines used to treat high blood pressure, some antidepressants; some anti-psychotics, quinidine, procainamide, benzodiazepines such as diazepam (Valium) or opiates (e.g. morphine). Since alcohol also may intensify the blood pressure lowering effect of nitroglycerin, patients receiving nitroglycerin should be advised to drink alcoholic beverages with caution.

Ergot alkaloids (e.g. Cafergot) and Imitrex can oppose the vasodilatory actions of nitroglycerin and may precipitate angina. A similar effect can occur with ephedrine and the decongestants pseudoephedrine (Sudafed) and propanolamine.

PREGNANCY: Since most persons who use nitroglycerin are over 50 years of age, experience with the use of nitroglycerin during pregnancy is limited. Nitroglycerin can be used during pregnancy if in the judgment of the physician the potential benefits justify the potential (though unknown) risks to the fetus.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if nitroglycerin is secreted in breast milk.

SIDE EFFECTS: A persistent, throbbing headache commonly occurs with nitroglycerin therapy. Aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen may be used to relieve the pain. Flushing of the head and neck can occur with nitroglycerin therapy as can an increase in heart rate or palpitations. This can be associated with a drop in blood pressure which can be accompanied by dizziness or weakness. To reduce the risk of low blood pressure, patients often are told to sit or lie down during and immediately after taking nitroglycerin.
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Old 01-14-2005, 10:45 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Holy crap! Yes I meant Systolic *gives an embarassing walk away*, it's 100 here in PA, then again we follow national which I won't even comment on LOL.

That is way more detail then I need, but at the same time gives exactly what I am looking for. Thanks again!

Now to find a Database program like Palm had (HanDbase or SmartList) so I can keep a list of our protocals.

Quote:
Synthesized in 1846, nitroglycerin was first used to treat anginal attacks in 1879. It was granted FDA approval in 1938.
I don't need this in the rig, but nice trivia bit for in station games ;) haha
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