BlackBerry Forums Support Community               

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-06-2006, 05:23 PM   #1 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Destroy Your Pearl

Please Login to Remove!

That is, before you sell it on eBay, return it to the carrier on a warranty claim, toss it into a recycle bin, donate it to charity or give it to a friend or relative.

RIM is on record that the Pearl's "wipe phone" feature is a secure method to destroy a phone's content, but I dunno if I trust that statement. In any event, you have to take steps to secure/destroy your data in the event you lose the phone.

Interesting in the one article that the user said his BlackBerry can destroy data on 11 attempts to enter an incorrect password. I like that. Anyone know how that is set up? Or is that a third party program or service for corporate accounts?

Kris Abel Blog :: Canada AM - Wiping Your Cellphone Clean Of Personal Data Before Selling, Recycling, Donating

USATODAY.com - Don't keep secrets on cellphone

Query: How do you set up the Pearl to require a password to use it, that is, after a certain time-out period. I can't for the life of me find that feature on the phone.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:26 PM   #2 (permalink)
BlackBerry God
 
LunkHead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Here
Model: 850
OS: 0.0.00001
PIN: kie swear
Carrier: USPS Priority
Posts: 10,962
Post Thanks: 143
Thanked 126 Times in 48 Posts
Default

USB wipe it using javaloader and reload the OS before you sell it or send it back to the carrier...

That will get rid of all personal data
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:27 PM   #3 (permalink)
Thumbs Must Hurt
 
AlwaysOn607's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Michigan
Model: Pearl
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 194
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Good info.

Go to tools, security, general options.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:37 PM   #4 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysOn607
Good info.

Go to tools, security, general options.
I have seen those menu selections, but where do I enter a password of my choosing? I don't see that anywhere.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:38 PM   #5 (permalink)
Stuck In The '70's Mod
 
ndub33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: The 'burbs east of Seattle.
Model: 9810
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 7,599
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Query: How do you set up the Pearl to require a password to use it, that is, after a certain time-out period. I can't for the life of me find that feature on the phone.[/quote]


Go to Settings>Security Options>General Settings. In the Password field, change to "Enabled" . It will ask you to type in a password and confirm it. You can alos change the number of attempts and the length of time until your Berry auto-locks form this screen (This is the Security Timeout field).
__________________
1st Step in Troubleshooting: Do you have a BlackBerry Data Plan?
2nd Step in Troubleshooting: Pull the Battery.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:43 PM   #6 (permalink)
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Model: 8100
Posts: 9
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I think it's definitely a good idea to wipe your phone of important data before selling or donating, but does anyone else find the linked articles to be a bit paranoid? I mean, running over old phones with a truck? I know the over the top methods of destroying the phones is meant to be kind of funny, but still. If you're simply throwing your phone away, or sticking it in a drawer and not using it, isn't it a bit paranoid to destroy the phone itself? What are the odds that someone's going to rifle through your trash, resurrect your data, and care about what's on your phone enough to use it against you?

I personally don't use a password at all. I've never lost a phone, but if I did, the worst that would happen is that someone would have my numbers and my emails about the latest gossip and drama among my friends. I guess it would probably be different if I were a CEO using the BB professionally. . . I definitely recommend a password protect for you guys.

~Jaq

PS As regarding the USA Today article, I don't feel a bit sorry for the philandering adulterer who's secret was exposed via his cellphone. Was he supposed to be a sympathetic character?
__________________
My 8100's battery smells exactly like celery. Don't know why. What a strange thing for a battery to smell like! Maybe I should just stop sniffing it.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:45 PM   #7 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Got it. Thanks.

I was hesitant because of the way it sets up. You "enable" the PW and then it asks to save the change. Without knowing it would then ask for a PW, I thought I'd be locked out.

They should change the interface to ask for a PW while in the setting/enabling fields. Maybe there is a reason why it is this way, but I don't see it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ndub33
Query: How do you set up the Pearl to require a password to use it, that is, after a certain time-out period. I can't for the life of me find that feature on the phone.

Go to Settings>Security Options>General Settings. In the Password field, change to "Enabled" . It will ask you to type in a password and confirm it. You can alos change the number of attempts and the length of time until your Berry auto-locks form this screen (This is the Security Timeout field).[/quote]
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 05:53 PM   #8 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

The concern is that many, many people use the BB as a sort of mini notebook computer and they have all sorts of sensitive information on the device. Sometimes it is simply the content of e-mails. Also, I'd like to know that when my friends' phones are lost, that things as ordinary as my home address, phones numbers and name are not available to creative crooks.

In fact, things will become even more sensitive with the new phones that allow you to swipe them at stores, like an ATM card, to make purchases.

Lastly, the acid bath, hammer and running over the phone techniques are for phones that people do not intend to pass on to someone else. The point is that those phones might someday fall into the wrong hands, especially when one has kept it in a drawer for a few years and then decides to toss it in the trash or give it to a recycler.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaqs
I think it's definitely a good idea to wipe your phone of important data before selling or donating, but does anyone else find the linked articles to be a bit paranoid? I mean, running over old phones with a truck? I know the over the top methods of destroying the phones is meant to be kind of funny, but still. If you're simply throwing your phone away, or sticking it in a drawer and not using it, isn't it a bit paranoid to destroy the phone itself? What are the odds that someone's going to rifle through your trash, resurrect your data, and care about what's on your phone enough to use it against you?

I personally don't use a password at all. I've never lost a phone, but if I did, the worst that would happen is that someone would have my numbers and my emails about the latest gossip and drama among my friends. I guess it would probably be different if I were a CEO using the BB professionally. . . I definitely recommend a password protect for you guys.

~Jaq

PS As regarding the USA Today article, I don't feel a bit sorry for the philandering adulterer who's secret was exposed via his cell phone. Was he supposed to be a sympathetic character?
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 06:25 PM   #9 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Some questions I had, like the ten incorrect password entry, are answered by RIM:

Livelink - Redirection
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 06:32 PM   #10 (permalink)
No longer Registered.
 
krad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Model: 0000
Posts: 788
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LunkHead
USB wipe it using javaloader and reload the OS before you sell it or send it back to the carrier...

That will get rid of all personal data
that is what i do...
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 06:39 PM   #11 (permalink)
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Model: 8100
Posts: 9
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanFrancisco
The concern is that many, many people use the BB as a sort of mini notebook computer and they have all sorts of sensitive information on the device. Sometimes it is simply the content of e-mails.
Which I acknowledged by suggesting that my data is not sensitive, but the data of those who use the BB professionally may be. I definitely think those with professional, credit card, social security, or password info on their smartphone should take steps to ensure that it doesn't fall into the wrong hands.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanFrancisco
Also, I'd like to know that when my friends' phones are lost, that things as ordinary as my home address, phones numbers and name are not available to creative crooks.
A truly creative crook would take up a job at a department store, and obtain the credit card info, and thus obtain the personal info, of everyone who passes through (they'd also have a sample of your signature, which they probably couldn't get from your phone). My point is, there are thousands of ways for someone to get your address that you can't do a thing about. It sucks, but such is the information age.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanFrancisco
Lastly, the acid bath, hammer and running over the phone techniques are for phones that people do not intend to pass on to someone else. The point is that those phones might someday fall into the wrong hands, especially when one has kept it in a drawer for a few years and then decides to toss it in the trash or give it to a recycler.
I understood the point of the articles, but MY point was actually that the odds of a criminal finding your phone in the trash, knowing what to do with it, and using it against you are miniscule. I'm not saying it's a bad idea to lock out and wipe old phones, even if you are just throwing them away, (in fact, it's probably a good idea) but running over the phone with a truck isn't a technique. It's paranoia.

Anyway, I'm not trying to argue or pick a fight. I'm just clarifying what I meant, since you seemed to infer that I didn't understand the purpose or need for wiping an old BB or cellphone. ;)
__________________
My 8100's battery smells exactly like celery. Don't know why. What a strange thing for a battery to smell like! Maybe I should just stop sniffing it.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 07:55 PM   #12 (permalink)
Thumbs Must Hurt
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: :noitacoL
Model: 8100
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 107
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanFrancisco
RIM is on record that the Pearl's "wipe phone" feature is a secure method to destroy a phone's content, but I dunno if I trust that statement.
The RIM device keeps all your information in a filesystem on the Flash. This is a seperate section of memory from the OS and Applications. When you run this tool it erases every sector of flash that has the filesystem in it - this is much more robust than say erasing a file on your computer (which technically just updates the FAT table, and does not actually change the information stored on the disk).
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 08:56 PM   #13 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaqs
Anyway, I'm not trying to argue or pick a fight. I'm just clarifying what I meant, since you seemed to infer that I didn't understand the purpose or need for wiping an old BB or cellphone. ;)
Inference not intended, was just giving some reasons to members on why they need to destroy the phone data. Your post was simply a vehicle to talk about it.
Offline  
Old 12-06-2006, 09:01 PM   #14 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fungineer
The RIM device keeps all your information in a filesystem on the Flash. This is a seperate section of memory from the OS and Applications. When you run this tool it erases every sector of flash that has the filesystem in it - this is much more robust than say erasing a file on your computer (which technically just updates the FAT table, and does not actually change the information stored on the disk).
Thanks for explaining that.

I always am suspicious that creative types know some way to defeat any security system. But on your explanation, I can see destroying flash as more complete and thorough than simply deleting files on a hard disk [or even doing a low level format].

On my hard disk that I fried the MBR, registry, etc., I was still able to use my file recovery software to access every file, about 180GB worth.
Offline  
Closed Thread


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On





Copyright 2004-2014 BlackBerryForums.com.
The names RIM and BlackBerry are registered Trademarks of BlackBerry Inc.