BlackBerry Forums Support Community               

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-09-2007, 11:44 AM   #41 (permalink)
Thumbs Must Hurt
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Model: 8100
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 53
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Please Login to Remove!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spectral View Post
Don't mistake an established TCP/IP connection for an "active" connection. If you're merely connected to an IM service or just connected to a host but aren't actively transmitting or receiving data, a call can still come through. If your connection is saturated, you cannot receive calls.
Interesting, you are correct. My original test was downloading a somewhat large file and the phone interrupted the download and rang. But I tried it using your example of downloading a MP3, and the phone did not ring. Very interesting.

Last edited by ski837547 : 07-09-2007 at 12:51 PM.
Offline  
Old 07-09-2007, 12:35 PM   #42 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
TheBigNewt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Prescott, AZ
Model: 8900
OS: 5.0.0.411
Carrier: Tmobile
Posts: 1,641
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanFrancisco View Post
Back when we discussed this in Jan-Feb of 07 I said that the touch screen and fixed battery would be the iPhone's biggest downfalls. I took the position that you simply cannot have a fixed or built-in battery on a cell phone. And typing on a touch screen is impractical and nonsense.



http://www.heartinsanfrancisco.com/bbiphonebattery.jpg
I also predicted the touchscreen typing would be a disadvantage. And that EDGE would drive 'em nuts trying to fill that big screen with pix from standard web pages. We BB users have learned to use some WAP sites for our little screens. It remains to be seen how this phone will do once the usual suspects buy theirs and report in. Also it remains to be seen what Apple will do to improve the device software/OS, stuff like MMS, Bluetooth, WiFi connections, custom ringtones, horizontal keyboard. These are things they can fix quickly, and future sales will partly depend on their response to complaints from the first wave of buyers. If they don't respond I predict their sales projections will not be met, and they come up short because the phone does meet the high expectations that accompany a very expensive device it's "Zune city" all over again, if you know what I mean. I also think Apple overestimates how much their buyers will love and wanna buy video for the phone and watch it all the time. I was all into that for my phone early on, but I don't use it much anymore. I do use music and pix way more. I can't imagine buying a $20 movie to watch on it.
__________________
BB 8900 Tmobile, Moto Droid Verizon

Last edited by TheBigNewt : 07-09-2007 at 12:44 PM.
Offline  
Old 07-26-2007, 06:04 PM   #43 (permalink)
b13
Thumbs Must Hurt
 
b13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: FRANCE
Model: 8100
PIN: 2408BC18
Carrier: cingular
Posts: 54
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

4. Programs.
Ok, the iPhone is secure.

hehe i phone isnt secure ;) it was hacked a week after it was on sale :p
Offline  
Old 07-26-2007, 06:39 PM   #44 (permalink)
Thumbs Must Hurt
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Model: 8100
Carrier: Rogers
Posts: 124
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Before I write this - I must state I love my 8100 and I would not trade it for an iPhone (yet).

But c'mon guys - don't look at the world with blinders on. There are certainly some cues that RIM could take from Apple to make a better Blackberry product. I'm just trying to be constructive here:

Email - yes RIM rules the roost here and push is totally the way to go. What can RIM learn? The iPhone renders HTML formatted e-mails beautifully. As far as the user-experience on formatted e-mails, my pearl just plain sucks. I had better rendering on my Treo 650 using snapper mail. I live with it because everything else about the device is so great.

Interface - Overall I love the Blackberry interface. But there are a lot of settings and options that get buried deeper than they should be and some of the names of said features are a little bit "cryptic". The unified options panel of the iPhone and the plain English descriptions go a long way on the human interface front.

Web Browser - There is no contest. Yes I read WAP sites and RSS feeds on my Pearl and the experience is great. But Blackberry could learn a thing or two about the mobile web experience from the iPhone. Although I do agree that I don't want the "complete" internet experience over Edge.

Multimedia - RIM could certainly improve the media player experience on the Blackberry. Play lists, more song data displayed etc. They could "iPodify" the experience a lot more than they have. As for Video - transcoding video is pretty hit and miss - You certainly just can't take almost any media file and dump it on the Blackberry to play. Also - how about some pre-encoded content RIM ? It's pretty darn cool that you can launch iTunes grab some geat-looking TV shows and movies - synch your phone and they just work. No transcoding just stick em on the phone and they play.

Pictures - Pics work great on my Pearl but if they are any larger than the screen size - it takes a few seconds to load each one. I have scrolled through pics with the iPhone - it's pretty fluid and snappy. Here's another improvement RIM could make.

Sorry for the long post - I am certainly not bashing. I love my Pearl and I am not switching. But don't just take this thread and make it about all the negatives. There are some things RIM could certainly learn. In fact - I hope they are reading this!
Offline  
Old 07-26-2007, 07:46 PM   #45 (permalink)
No longer Registered.
 
Dawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Atlanta
Model: 8330
OS: 4.5.0.138
PIN: 31a6c9c9
Carrier: Verizon BIS
Posts: 13,962
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bb-mike View Post
Before I write this - I must state I love my 8100 and I would not trade it for an iPhone (yet).

But c'mon guys - don't look at the world with blinders on. There are certainly some cues that RIM could take from Apple to make a better Blackberry product. I'm just trying to be constructive here:

Email - yes RIM rules the roost here and push is totally the way to go. What can RIM learn? The iPhone renders HTML formatted e-mails beautifully. As far as the user-experience on formatted e-mails, my pearl just plain sucks. I had better rendering on my Treo 650 using snapper mail. I live with it because everything else about the device is so great. HTML isnt safe

Interface - Overall I love the Blackberry interface. But there are a lot of settings and options that get buried deeper than they should be and some of the names of said features are a little bit "cryptic". The unified options panel of the iPhone and the plain English descriptions go a long way on the human interface front.Dont have any issues doing what I need to

Web Browser - There is no contest. Yes I read WAP sites and RSS feeds on my Pearl and the experience is great. But Blackberry could learn a thing or two about the mobile web experience from the iPhone. Although I do agree that I don't want the "complete" internet experience over Edge. Yeah this could be better but its not as fast as the BB

Multimedia - RIM could certainly improve the media player experience on the Blackberry. Play lists, more song data displayed etc. They could "iPodify" the experience a lot more than they have. As for Video - transcoding video is pretty hit and miss - You certainly just can't take almost any media file and dump it on the Blackberry to play. Also - how about some pre-encoded content RIM ? It's pretty darn cool that you can launch iTunes grab some geat-looking TV shows and movies - synch your phone and they just work. No transcoding just stick em on the phone and they play.I do agree here

Pictures - Pics work great on my Pearl but if they are any larger than the screen size - it takes a few seconds to load each one. I have scrolled through pics with the iPhone - it's pretty fluid and snappy. Here's another improvement RIM could make. Agree here as well

Sorry for the long post - I am certainly not bashing. I love my Pearl and I am not switching. But don't just take this thread and make it about all the negatives. There are some things RIM could certainly learn. In fact - I hope they are reading this!

Offline  
Old 07-26-2007, 08:37 PM   #46 (permalink)
Talking BlackBerry Encyclopedia
 
Spectral's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Model: 8100
PIN: 23FA9743
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 337
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawg View Post
HTML isnt safe
Are you serious? It this why the BlackBerry browser supports not just HTML but JavaScript? If we were talking about VBS support, I would agree with you, but the email client's lack of HTML support has nothing whatsoever to do with safety.
Offline  
Old 07-27-2007, 10:11 AM   #47 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
zero7404's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: tri-state
Model: 9530
OS: 5.0.0.328
PIN: n/a
Carrier: tmob
Posts: 1,097
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by prodigee View Post
what's good about the keys (on any phone) is that you can actually FEEL them. that's my 2 cents.
i'm surprised that no major cell phone manufacturer has decided to go the route that Alpine Electronics did with thier touch screen widescreen car audio decks.

i messed with one a few times (the single din flip out type) and it had this nice 'buzz' on the part of the screen you were touching. so if you select an option, that button will feel tacky and give a feedback vibration.

i think that would be the only solution to multi-touch screen technology to win over ppl that want the feel of real buttons.

and that's my .0002 cents.
Offline  
Old 07-27-2007, 11:18 AM   #48 (permalink)
Talking BlackBerry Encyclopedia
 
King-B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Greenville SC
Model: 8100
PIN: 23F8E72F
Carrier: SunCom
Posts: 207
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sakman74 View Post
i'm surprised that no major cell phone manufacturer has decided to go the route that Alpine Electronics did with thier touch screen widescreen car audio decks.

i messed with one a few times (the single din flip out type) and it had this nice 'buzz' on the part of the screen you were touching. so if you select an option, that button will feel tacky and give a feedback vibration.

i think that would be the only solution to multi-touch screen technology to win over ppl that want the feel of real buttons.

and that's my .0002 cents.
I wouldnt mind using something like that as well. Has anybody played with the new Verizon Chocolate? I heard the new version gives a "buzz" when tapping the flat buttons. Curious to see how that works.
__________________
Thou shall play, or get played.
Nothin to Prove
Your mom>iPhone
Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 01:14 AM   #49 (permalink)
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Model: 8100
PIN: N/A
Carrier: t-mobile
Posts: 8
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Where did you get the visual voicemail I want that app!
Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 01:22 AM   #50 (permalink)
Knows Where the Search Button Is
 
tennapop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Richmond, VA
Model: 9930
OS: 7.0.0.362
PIN: 33109831
Carrier: nTelos
Posts: 44
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by anj20 View Post
Where did you get the visual voicemail I want that app!
Its called SimulSays. It's by SimulScribe. Google it. It's a GREAT program. I'm using it all the time. I need a chance to check voicemail on the fly, and with all of the business calls I get, it's great to prioritize voicemails. Clients love it too. They use it for the same thing.
__________________
my Twitter
Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 02:04 AM   #51 (permalink)
New Member
 
akared98's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Model: 8310
PIN: 246942A6
Carrier: AT&T
Posts: 12
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Has any one mentioned the iphone battery? If my 8100 battery goes dead, I just go to the store and get a new one. How about those, eh hem, Apples?

Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 02:06 AM   #52 (permalink)
BBF Moderator
 
John Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Model: Z30
OS: 10.2.1.x
PIN: s & needles
Carrier: AT&T
Posts: 34,686
Post Thanks: 4
Thanked 100 Times in 72 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by akared98 View Post
How about those, eh hem, Apples?

I bet it's fun to send a $500 phone back to the factory for a new battery.
Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 10:20 AM   #53 (permalink)
CrackBerry Addict
 
zimbu1234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: NYC
Model: 9780
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 516
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I love my Pearl but that iPhone is a sweet looking phone and that browser is pretty damn impressive. If I didn't have a BB for work purposes, I would probably consider an iPhone, but would probably stick with the BB. Although if I had never used a BB before, I would have gotten an iPhone with no questions asked!
Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 12:19 PM   #54 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by akared98 View Post
Has any one mentioned the iphone battery?

Uh yeah, read my below posts.

The battery has been the subject of criticism and discussion since January 2007 when the iPhone was first rumored and then announced at MacWorld.

In regards to "how about them Apples" what I find interesting is that I have yet to find a single person or Apple explain [or defend] the reason for making the battery non-removable.

Some have noted that "well, it's like on the iPod" but that is not an explanation, that's simply a notation. Some have speculated that making the battery non-removable is Apple's way of keeping control of its products and users. Maybe.

As I said six months ago, I think the non-removable battery and the touch screen pad will be the main reasons the Newton II [excuse me, I mean the iPhone] will fail as a phone.

A cell phone cannot have a non-removable battery due to usage concerns [many people have two batteries for their phones] and people are not going to go without a phone's contacts and data while their phone battery is being replaced.

And the touch screen is impractical for e-mail and texting. Reports are in that people are having difficulty entering phone numbers while on the move, something that can be done "one-handed" with a keypad.

As a multi-media device it might make it, but not as a phone. In fact, I think Apple is currently running ads that seem to be saying the iPhone is an iPod with a phone which arguably shifts the iPhone into the entertainment device market and away from the smartphone industry.

IMHO, if that is now Apple's intent then the iPhone should NOT be compared to smartphone models such as the Pearl [this shift would be a dramatic change from what Jobs asserted at the annual MacWorld, see below].


Last edited by SanFrancisco : 07-30-2007 at 12:26 PM.
Offline  
Old 07-30-2007, 11:23 PM   #55 (permalink)
New Member
 
mr.gadget's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Brooklyn
Model: 8320
OS: v4.5.0.81
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 11
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I am not a ifan...

$650 buck with a plan is too much for phone even if its made by Apple

...

I am not a ifollower

ismart
__________________
Life is to short to hate and be jealous.
Offline  
Old 08-01-2007, 12:12 PM   #56 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

As many of you know, IMHO the Pearl is the best phone out there. Been saying that since September 06. And I continue to believe that the iPhone will fail due to its battery and touchscreen.

Look at these articles that just came out. Standby for the Pearl 2, say goodbye to the iPhone [unless they change it]:

________________________________________

July 31, 2007

New York State's Consumer Protection Board has raised some complaints about the iPhone's battery and the phone's repair and return policies in a letter to Apple, the agency said yesterday.

The rechargeable battery must eventually be replaced by Apple Computer Inc., which makes the device, when the battery no longer holds a charge. Apple charges $79 plus $6.95 shipping for the battery replacement after the one-year warranty has expired on the device, which sells for $500 to $600 with a two-year wireless contract with AT&T.

"I encourage Apple to redesign the iPhone in order to provide for a replaceable battery," Mindy Bockstein, chairwoman and executive director of the state's Consumer Protection Board, wrote to Steve Jobs, chief executive of Apple, in a letter dated July 17 that the agency provided to Newsday yesterday.

In a news release, Bockstein said, "A high-end cell phone shouldn't have to have low-end customer service."

Two representatives for Apple did not return phone calls and e-mails.

Zach Zadek, 14, an iPhone enthusiast from Dix Hills, said he's "not happy" that he would have to send the iPhone to Apple to have the battery replaced. But as an owner of an iPod, which also lacks a user-replaceable battery, he's accustomed to the policy.

Bockstein also told Jobs that Apple should provide free rental phones as customers wait for repairs to the iPhone. "Consumers should not have to rent an iPhone for $29 because their expensive iPhone failed to perform as expected and needs repair," she wrote.

She also said Apple should extend its 14-day return policy to 30 days, which is the period AT&T allows for the wireless service the phone uses.

Furthermore, Apple shouldn't charge a 10-percent restocking fee and should review how it discloses contract terms and conditions, warranties and return policies, Bockstein wrote.

An iPhone user filed a class-action lawsuit last week claiming Apple didn't inform customers that Apple must replace the battery, according to news reports. Apple's Web site discloses the battery may eventually lose its ability to hold a charge and must be replaced by Apple.

The site says users can extend battery life by charging the iPhone at least once a month and keeping its software up-to-date as engineers may develop new ways to optimize performance.

_______________________________________
Another News Article
_______________________________________

An Illinois resident has filed a lawsuit against Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL) The suit, brought by Jose Trujillo, claims customers were not clearly informed that the iPhone was sealed, and that the device would have to be sent away for battery replacement at an additional cost.

"Unknown to the plaintiff and undisclosed to the public prior to purchase, the iPhone is a sealed unit with its battery soldered on the inside of the device so that it cannot be changed by the owner," reads the complaint. "The battery enclosed in the iPhone can only be charged approximately 300 times before it will be in need of replacement, necessitating a new battery annually for owners of the iPhone."

Apple's battery replacement policy -- now clearly stated on the Web site -- is that it will charge US$79 plus $6.95 shipping for the replacement after the one-year warranty has expired on the device. Trujillo filed the suit in the Circuit Court of Cook County. He is seeking class action status.
Road Map to Dismissal

Apple and AT&T's likely first order of business will be to defeat the request for class certification. Indeed, if class certification is denied, it is likely Trujillo will drop the suit. If it is not, chances are good Apple will negotiate a settlement, Christopher S. Griesmeyer, a partner in the litigation practice at Levenfeld Pearlstein, told MacNewsWorld.

"Apple almost always fights these suits, but in a typical case a class action status is a good reason to settle," he said.

Apple will likely attempt to have the case moved to federal court, because "appellate courts have not been particularly friendly to class actions," Dwight Davis, a senior partner in the litigation practice group at King & Spalding, told MacNewsWorld.

More than likely it will succeed, he said, and thus have a good chance of avoiding the class action.

However, such outcomes can be especially difficult to second guess. "If this were to go to trial, I would say it would justify class certification," Todd W. Bonder, a partner with Rosenfeld, Meyer & Susman, told MacNewsWorld. "The issue is not limited to the plaintiff, but affects everyone who bought the iPhone over that time period."

The plaintiff has a number of challenges to meet in the courtroom, though, even if the case does win class action status. In short, the suit might not have merit, since the argument might prevail that most savvy consumers should expect such a battery replacement requirement. "I am not sure if what is being alleged is actionable in a court of law," Bonder said.

Another barrier for the plaintiff is the question of Apple's intent to deceive customers, Davis added. "It will be a difficult claim to prove," he predicted.
Reasonable Expectations

On the other hand, while Apple fans may be incredulous that anyone could assume that the battery would not have to be professionally replaced, the courts may well decide otherwise, since the iPhone is a hybrid device.

Should the case proceed to trial, Apple and the courts will spend a lot of time determining whether the initial buyers were expecting it to be similar to an iPod or to a cell phone.

"If they were expecting an iPod, then they should be used to it being a sealed device. A cell phone customer invariably, though, will expect the battery to be able to be removed," Griesmeyer pointed out.

The matter of the 300 charges, though, is likely to be more clear-cut, as battery life and performance were highlighted both by Apple and by product reviewers even before the iPhone's auspicious debut.

It would be difficult to prove that Apple was deceptive about the battery life, as the battery specs were one of the chief complaints about the product. Shortly before its launch, Apple revised its earlier estimates about performance. The new specs were eight hours of talk time, six hours of Internet use, seven hours of video or 24 hours of audio playback; compared with five hours of talk time, five hours of Internet use, and five hours of video or 16 hours of audio playback.
What It Knew, When It Knew It

None of this, though, may be relevant to the case. "This isn't a fight about technology and battery performance," said Griesmeyer. "It is about the notice Apple provided to its customers: what did it know, when did it know it, and when did it communicate that knowledge to that first round of buyers."

At the moment, it is unclear when Apple went public with its battery replacement policy. It posted details on the company Web site on Friday, June 29, some time after the product went on sale that same day, a company spokesperson reportedly told the Associated Press.

For their part, consumer advocates have also taken Apple to task for its disclosure, or lack thereof, of the battery replacement policy. New York State's Consumer Protection Board, for example, sent a letter to Apple complaining about the iPhone's battery and the phone's repair and return policies. So did the Foundation for Consumer and Taxpayer Rights, which said that the iPhone's battery and repair costs should have been clearly disclosed earlier.

Does all this, though, add up to a legitimate lawsuit against Apple -- much less one with class action status?

A jury would likely be impatient with both defendant and plaintiff, Griesmeyer speculated.

"A Cook County jury is not going to have much sympathy for a bunch of people who spent $500 or $600 on a phone," he said. At the same time, he continued, they are not going to be pleased with a company that withholds information from customers in order to increase profits."

Last edited by SanFrancisco : 08-01-2007 at 01:27 PM.
Offline  
Old 08-01-2007, 04:28 PM   #57 (permalink)
Thumbs Must Hurt
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Model: 8100
Carrier: Rogers
Posts: 124
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

So much of this is just static and media bandwagon jumping.

iPods have no replaceable battery and they have a 70%+ market share for many years now.

Apple sold 270,000 iPhones in the first 48 hours of launch.

Do I think that having a non-replaceable battery is a good idea? No. But the iPhone is not going anywhere (and fortunately, neither is the Pearl).

I'm still a bit taken aback by how unwilling many people on these boards are to look at the positives of this product.

As I stated above - I am not giving up my Pearl for an iPhone. But to say the iPhone is doomed is just plain silly.
Offline  
Old 08-01-2007, 05:06 PM   #58 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bb-mike View Post
So much of this is just static and media bandwagon jumping.

iPods have no replaceable battery and they have a 70%+ market share for many years now.

Apple sold 270,000 iPhones in the first 48 hours of launch.

Do I think that having a non-replaceable battery is a good idea? No. But the iPhone is not going anywhere (and fortunately, neither is the Pearl).

I'm still a bit taken aback by how unwilling many people on these boards are to look at the positives of this product.

As I stated above - I am not giving up my Pearl for an iPhone. But to say the iPhone is doomed is just plain silly.
As to your 270,000 sales number: I heard that AT & T sold about 146,000 iPhones [meaning people signed up for the service. Many phones were sold by Apple to people who did not want the iPhone for use as a phone and Apple skewed the numbers]. See below for further comment.

As to the negatives of the iPhone, this is the Pearl forum, so what should one expect as to opinions? Actually, it would be abnormal on a BB Forum to read a bunch of cheer leading posts about the iPhone. In any event, we have mentioned the positives of the iPhone [nice form factor, unique user interface, large display], but those positives don't make a hoot of difference to overcome the iPhone's major flaws.

And when I say the iPhone is doomed, I mean as a cell phone and competitor against smartphones, including the Pearl. Sure, the iPhone will be around for a long time, but I bet Apple changes the battery from being soldered to the motherboard and non-removable. And like I said earlier, it cannot be compared to the Pearl [a smartphone] and will instead be marketed as an entertainment device with a cell phone tossed in, a glorified iPod, if you will.

And consider that less than one month after the iPhone's debut:

1. There is a lot of criticism of the phone;

2. Apple has greatly reduced it's battery life claims, interestingly AFTER people bought the phone in reliance on Apple's original claims;

3. Class action lawsuits have been filed;

4. State consumer protection agencies are going after Apple;

5. There was lackluster sales of the iPhone [some had projected AT & T selling 500,000 units during the debut; instead they sold about 146,000]. Apple reported 270,000 sold, but has since "confessed" that it was including in its numbers phones distributed to AT&T for them to sell. That's like Ford saying that the Taurus was the number one selling American car, but they included in that number the cars sold to rental car agencies, which was not a true gauge of sales to the public.

Apple shares fall 6% as AT&T posts disappointing iPhone numbers - MarketWatch

In contrast, I don't recall seeing any negative publicity about the Pearl when it went on sale, and for sure, no class action lawsuits. Yes, there was some negative talk on these boards, but I don't count that as negative publicity [e.g., in the media].

Last edited by SanFrancisco : 08-01-2007 at 05:10 PM.
Offline  
Old 08-01-2007, 05:12 PM   #59 (permalink)
BlackBerry Master
 
test54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Model: AAPL
OS: iPhone
Carrier: is Better than BB :)
Posts: 3,633
Post Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanFrancisco View Post
As to sales: I heard that AT & T sold about 146,000 iPhones [meaning people signed up for the service. Many phones were sold by Apple to people who did not want the iPhone for use as a phone].

Well that would be hard because it can only be used as an ipod if activated or hacked. Seems pretty expensive for a ipod only device. People bought more than one device thats why the numbers are different, and the 146K is activations not sales. 230k is sales form both apple and ATT.

"Notable Calls submits: RBC Capital notes their checks suggest Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) may plan to produce 8M iPhones CY07, implying 12-14M unit sales end CY08, well ahead of Apple's publicly stated 18-month 10M goal."

"The company aims to sell at least 730,000 iPhones by September, pushing total orders to more than 1 million units. It took seven quarters for iPod sales to top the 1 million mark, Cook said. Similarly, the plan to turn the iPhone into Apple's third major business won't happen overnight, he said."


Everyone gets so defensive about iphone, its not going away and neither is any other competitor of RIM, except maybe Palm.

"Shares of Cupertino, California-based Apple gained $1.34 to $133.10 in trading before the open of U.S. exchanges. They have risen 55 percent this year." -Today from Bloomberg

and they are at 135.00 Right now, up $2.34 Today since trading opened today. Stocks are not a symbol of success but of making money, but since you brought them up.

Bloomberg.com: Investment Tools
__________________
"A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any invention in human history - with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila." - unknown

Last edited by test54 : 08-01-2007 at 05:19 PM.
Offline  
Old 08-01-2007, 05:38 PM   #60 (permalink)
BlackBerry Extraordinaire
 
SanFrancisco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Francisco
Model: 9700
OS: XP, 7
PIN: HEAD
Carrier: T-Mobile
Posts: 2,345
Post Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by test54 View Post
Well that would be hard because it can only be used as an ipod if activated or hacked. Seems pretty expensive for a ipod only device. People bought more than one device thats why the numbers are different, and the 146K is activations not sales. 230k is sales form both apple and ATT.
The media said the same thing, that getting an iPhone for use as an iPod was an expensive way to go. But that's what some people were doing.

Apple's numbers also included people buying the phone on spec [to sell on eBay] and also Apple's sales of around 100,000 units to AT&T for their inventory.

In any event, regardless of the sales totals or how one arrives at that number, the important point is that sales of the iPhone were disappointing to both AT&T and Apple. Of course, just like presidential candidates and Apple fans, you are not going to see AT& T and Apple admit such and instead will will put a positive spin on the negatives, but facts are facts.

In comparing the iPhone to the Pearl for the past six months we have talked negatively about the touch screen, the non-removable battery, no open source for developers, EDGE only speed, etc. Some of us predicted lackluster sales after the lemmings rushed out to get the phone.

So far, one month into sales, many of our criticisms and predictions have been proved correct or accurate.

Another article:

iPhone Sales and the Product Itself Disappointing @ AJAXWORLD MAGAZINE

Last edited by SanFrancisco : 08-01-2007 at 05:51 PM.
Offline  
Closed Thread


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On





Copyright 2004-2014 BlackBerryForums.com.
The names RIM and BlackBerry are registered Trademarks of BlackBerry Inc.