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Old 03-10-2007, 01:57 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Let's recap what we know about the "8300"

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Ok, so we know now that the RIM road map document that was leaked in October was accurate. The 8800 looks exactly the same and has the right features and everything, just like it says. Couple that with the fact that this new camera has:

1) Treo-like keys
2) Silver color
3) A camera

EXACTLY the features of the Crimson, and looks exactly like the Crimson, compare:




The only difference is the color of some of the keys, that's it. And look at the bottom edge of the phones, both of them have a very distinctive cutout. They are the same phone, people. Call it 8300, 8800, 8830 whatever you want, but it's the same phone. And it makes total sense considering it was next up on the road map. It says "Availability Spring 2007". Spring is from March 20 to June 21. That's probably when we'll see it.

Now as far as carriers go lets think about this logically for a second. Look at this other road map slide:



It's a Quadband GSM. There are only two GSM carriers in the US, Cingular and T-Mobile. Cingular JUST released the 8800, which is just like this phone but doesn't have wi-fi or a camera. It makes absolutely no sense for Cingular to release another phone right now to compete with the 8800 that they just released. But it totally makes sense that this phone would be for T-Mobile, consider there the only carrier LEFT. What seals the deal though is this last slide:



It says "802.11bg. Voice and data at home and on the road via Wi-Fi hotspots. Driving adoption of mobile as primary device through operator controlled UMA/GAN access."

Who is the only provider that has been testing UMA? T-Mobile.

So to summarize the conclusions:
This phone is the Crimson
It's basically an 8800 with Wi-Fi and a camera
It's coming out on T-Mobile
It should be available between March 20-June 21
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Old 03-10-2007, 07:13 AM   #2 (permalink)
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From what I've read, full nationwide rollout of T-Mobile UTMS isn't expected to occur until June - so just sit back and chill a couple months, folks (as I've decided to do).
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Old 03-10-2007, 11:21 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Have you read the Boy Genius report on this yet? it actually shows screen shots of AT&T/Cingular on the device.

There is no wi-fi on the one BG was testing
It has a full system wide spell check
Speaker is better than the 8800
the keyboard to be much easier to use, a la 8700-style
little thinner, and smaller than the 8800
No video recording
Runs OS 4.2.2.38
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Old 03-10-2007, 12:46 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nike30
From what I've read, full nationwide rollout of T-Mobile UTMS isn't expected to occur until June - so just sit back and chill a couple months, folks (as I've decided to do).
I never said anything about UTMS, which is T-Mobiles 3G network. I was talking about using wifi for UMA, or as T-Mobile calls it Hotspot@Home:

T-Mobile - Hot Spot @ Home
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Old 03-10-2007, 02:08 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcm
Have you read the Boy Genius report on this yet? it actually shows screen shots of AT&T/Cingular on the device.
He's also had shots of 8800 with t-mo theme, it doesn't mean it's the launch carrier.
I would assume that since he works for cingular, that would be his default theme upon getting the device.
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Old 03-10-2007, 04:46 PM   #6 (permalink)
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My understanding is that the individual carriers order the features, like WiFi, that they want. So conceivably Cingular could have it without WiFi enabled while T-Mobile could offer it with WiFi. This talk of the camera not doing video is troubling to me. Perhaps that's a carrier-selected feature as well though.

One question that's been puzzling me is the WiFi and data. If you need a dedicated Blackberry data plan to use any data at all, how will data over WiFi work? Could they link your ability to use WiFi for data to your service books? I've used WiFi with laptops to get my email, and even used it with a Sony Clie PDA for email and the web, but I'm curious as to how it would be implimented with a Blackberry and their well known (but little searched for) need for a dedicated BB data plan.
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Old 03-10-2007, 05:10 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perfect Storm
He's also had shots of 8800 with t-mo theme, it doesn't mean it's the launch carrier.
I would assume that since he works for cingular, that would be his default theme upon getting the device.
THEME or NETWORK indicator?
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Old 03-10-2007, 05:32 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Theme...like I said...
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Old 03-10-2007, 05:38 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rambo47
One question that's been puzzling me is the WiFi and data. If you need a dedicated Blackberry data plan to use any data at all, how will data over WiFi work? Could they link your ability to use WiFi for data to your service books? I've used WiFi with laptops to get my email, and even used it with a Sony Clie PDA for email and the web, but I'm curious as to how it would be implimented with a Blackberry and their well known (but little searched for) need for a dedicated BB data plan.
From what I understand from other GAN phones is that it will essentially be the exact same billing and plan as over the cellular network. With GAN you basically go through WIFI to the internet to the carrier, instead of going over the GSM/GPRS network to the carrier. It's the same end location, just a different route.

The carriers can also offer deals like unlimited voice/data over WIFI for a reduced rate because it takes strain off their cell network...plus it increases their coverage.
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Old 03-10-2007, 06:18 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perfect Storm
Theme...like I said...
Only ask, because I had'nt seen "leaked" photos of the 8800 with a tmobile THEME, but I did see the tmobile network on a few (only indicating it was unlocked)...

oh well
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Old 03-10-2007, 08:39 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Works for Cingular...hmm, didn't hear that one yet...
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Old 03-11-2007, 10:16 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Screw the 8800, this thing looks awesome. If T-Mobile drops this, I am all in. Wi-Fi would be a plus, but no biggie. I just want a relatively small device with the full qwerty and OS 4.2. I love my pearl, and could not go to the 8800 based on the size. That 8800 is HUGE!
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Old 03-11-2007, 10:17 AM   #13 (permalink)
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BG - you should try and get some shots of this next to your 8800 so we could see a size comparo. Youre the man.
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Old 03-11-2007, 11:18 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Yep, you'll be seeing OS walkthrough, comparison shots, and other related posts in the next few days.
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Old 03-11-2007, 06:41 PM   #15 (permalink)
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[quote=dhendriksen I love my pearl, and could not go to the 8800 based on the size. That 8800 is HUGE![/QUOTE]

Huge...as compared to what?
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Old 03-12-2007, 09:19 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Hi,

I like the keyboard on this device (specifically the separation between keys) vs. the 8800.

Just trying to figure out if I should go 8300 or 8800.

Does the 8300 have all the features of the 8800 including walkie-talkie/push-to-talk?

Thanks,
eagle
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Old 03-12-2007, 11:48 AM   #17 (permalink)
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i doubt it will have GPS, so there is one trade off and the cam is no good for people like myself who cant have cam phones... but i love the layout of the keyboard comapred to the 8800 just based on pics... its a shame i have to wait for a 9xxx to come out
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Old 03-12-2007, 11:56 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetspeedz
i doubt it will have GPS, so there is one trade off and the cam is no good for people like myself who cant have cam phones... but i love the layout of the keyboard comapred to the 8800 just based on pics... its a shame i have to wait for a 9xxx to come out
Boy Genius is on record stating his 8300 does have GPS.


'The Boy Genius said:

It does have GPS and MicroSD slot. 2 megapixel camera, with a great flash. The feel of the 8300 is really hurting up my 8800 right now. The 8800 feels like a square paperweight now…sad. Comparison shots soon, also OS walkthough highlighting the new features!'
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Old 03-12-2007, 01:08 PM   #19 (permalink)
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I thing we DO know!

Cingular is going to have it!
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Old 03-12-2007, 11:04 PM   #20 (permalink)
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There is a very good article in the March 12 San Francisco Chronicle about WiFi's security hazards. SNAFU raised similar issues in its initial opposition to Mayor Newsom's WiFi initiative back in September 2005.

It's easy to spy on your Wi-Fi / Experts say home networks are particularly vulnerable

It's easy to spy on your Wi-Fi
Experts say home networks are particularly vulnerable Dan Fost, Chronicle Staff Writer

Monday, March 12, 2007

When many of the computer industry's top security gurus gathered in San Francisco last month for a conference, an Atlanta company decided to point its radar toward the airwaves and see how much of the show's wireless activity it could see.

The distressing and ironic answer? The Boston hackers could eavesdrop on more than half of the wireless traffic ... at a security conference!

If most of the people attending last month's RSA Conference have not taken the basic precautions to protect their online activity while using public Wi-Fi, then what of all those civilians setting up shop in cafes and airports?

In short, say computer security experts, people are putting themselves at risk every day.

The risk could be reaching one of its highest levels as the country approaches tax season and some of the most sensitive personal and financial information travels the Wi-Fi airwaves. More than 73 million people filed their taxes electronically last year, according to the Internal Revenue Service, and 46 million have already done so this year.


"When it comes to wireless security, there is a profound amount of user indifference. You don't really see what you are getting yourself into,"
said Amit Sinha, chief technology officer of AirDefense, the Atlanta company that conducted "wireless airwave monitoring" one morning at the RSA Conference. AirDefense found that 56 percent of 623 devices -- laptops, cell phones, personal digital assistants and PCs -- were susceptible to attacks.

Sandra Toms LaPedis, area vice president and general manager of RSA Conferences, said the conference's Wi-Fi network was secure -- and in fact drew complaints because it was so hard to access. But companies with booths at Moscone Center set up their own wireless networks, which were much easier to compromise.

"It underscores the battle (information technology) professionals are undertaking in corporations, as they try to get their people to understand the risks that are out there," LaPedis said.

The risks are everywhere, not just in the cafes.

"Wi-Fi, as implemented out of the box, is not only not secure, it's promiscuous," said David Perry, director of global education for Trend Micro, a Japanese maker of security software.

If you use it at home, you're likely to be opening yourself up to attacks unless you take precautions. If you use Wi-Fi in a cafe, "It turns your network into a radio station," Perry said. Or you could be connecting to an "evil twin" -- a Wi-Fi network set up by a bad guy posing as the cafe's network.

And if you use a publicly available computer, such as one in a library, "assume that it's compromised," Perry said. "A lot of those are infected with keyloggers, screenscrapers, bots, rootkits, data stealers, all kinds of stuff."

At the Black Hat Convention in Washington last month, where security experts gather to marshal forces against the dark side of computing, Robert Graham of Errata Security, a high-end firm in Atlanta, demonstrated his new tool, Ferret. It impressed even the wizards at Black Hat with its ability to watch all the traffic in a network. Graham has made the tool available free on his Web site.

"We demonstrated how open people are, and how much they're broadcasting to the world, even if they're using (security tools such as) virtual private networks and encryption," Graham said.

In addition to the threats in public, many people do not secure their home Wi-Fi networks, sometimes because of the hassle, and sometimes because of an egalitarian impulse to share their Wi-Fi. After all, many well-meaning people have participated in "wardriving," the practice of driving around a neighborhood until you find a connection you can piggyback onto without needing a password. Sinha at AirDefense said the Web site WiGLE - Wireless Geographic Logging Engine - Plotting WiFi on Maps lists more than 9 million such connections that users have entered, a number growing daily.

"The home presents even more vulnerabilities than hotspot environments,"
said Stu Elefant, senior product manager at McAfee Inc., the security software firm in Santa Clara.

"With wireless networks, your data is being transmitted over the open air," Elefant said. "Anyone can grab those data packets. And they can jump on your home wireless network to do bad things to you, and to other people. It's as if they came in your front door and plugged into your network. They can look for vulnerabilities, out-of-date security software, unpatched operating system holes," and they can set up your computer as a "bot" or "zombie" that they can use for other attacks.

"Wireless gives them a semblance of anonymity," he said. "They can launch spam on other people, launch virus attacks on other people, steal pirated material, and the homeowner is the one who is going to get the knock on the door from the FBI."

And while it might feel unlikely that someone will drive through a particular neighborhood looking for a Wi-Fi network to exploit, Elefant said they don't need to. "It's been proven through Defcon, an industry trade association, that wireless networks can be connected to from 100 miles away with a high-gain antenna."

But all the scary rhetoric doesn't mean there are no solutions out there. There are many things people can do to make themselves safer, but those things often mean spending a little money and time.

Two of the most popular solutions are from Bay Area security software companies Symantec and McAfee. McAfee Wireless Protection sells for
$29.99 for a year and its flagship McAfee Total Protection is $59.99.
Total Protection offers a more complete suite, including firewall, backup, antivirus and antispam. Symantec's Norton Internet Security 2007 features antivirus and firewall, among other things, and is priced at
$69.99 for a year's subscription; Norton 360 is $79.99 for one year and includes backup and tuneup, and is billed as being more comprehensive and easier to use. Both companies' products may be installed on up to three machines.

One small free solution is from San Francisco's OpenDNS, which offers a new approach to the Internet's Domain Name System. While OpenDNS says it can speed up Web cruising, it says one other benefit is that it can tell what is a real site and what is an "evil twin," even if there is no difference to even the most experienced user.

"Users who set up OpenDNS are prevented from getting pharming attacks when using compromised access points at Internet cafes," said David Ulevitch, the chief executive.

AirDefense also offers a free download, AirDefense Personal, that protects against evil twins, although most of its products sell for more than $1,000 to large corporations.

With the solutions available, people should feel somewhat safer in their online interactions. Run everything through what Paul Miller, managing director of Symantec's mobile security group, calls a "secure tunnel,"
and you should be safe.

"It's up to you to have good security," he said. "We want to foster confidence in a connected world."



------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
Safe wireless surfing
Security experts offer these tips when using wireless Internet access:

-- Use a suite of security software, including a firewall, like those available from McAfee, Symantec and Trend Micro. Make sure your software is up to date. Some companies, such as Webroot of Boulder, Colo., offer free scans of your system from their Web sites.

-- When logging on in a cafe or hotel, make sure you find out from an employee what the name of the network is, so you don't fall for a phony network set up by a hacker.

-- Change the password when you set up your router at home.

-- Try using OpenDNS, a free service at OpenDNS | Providing A Safer And Faster DNS, which will change the router's settings and, among other things, prevent pharming attacks (in which you think you're entering data at, say, your bank's Web site, but really you're at a fake site).

-- When on a secure financial site, make sure the address bar reads https (the "s" at the end stands for "secure") and that a picture of a lock shows up next to the address.

-- To get particularly tricky, when setting up your laptop, Robert Graham of Atlanta's Errata Security suggests giving yourself a gender-bending sign-in. If your name is Bob, make your sign-in Mary.
Most hackers wouldn't suspect people of lying to their own computer, and it will throw them off the trail of your data.

-- If you get confused, call tech support for the router or the security software. You can also pay for a service like Best Buy's Geek Squad to fix the problem.

Source: Chronicle research
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