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Old 07-16-2007, 09:14 PM   #81 (permalink)
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A few comments after 48 hours with the 8830 on Sprint. So far the service itself has been surprisingly good, even going through rural CO. The device is clearly a refinement and improvement over the ATT and Verizon versions. The keyboard is not an issue for me; it's as easy as the 8700. Telephone quality is excellent...better than my Moto 815 on Verizon. And now a question for the more knowledgeable folks on this Forum: Why do the carriers stick with the original versions of their hardware? ATT is still selling the same 8700C I got from Cingular almost 20 months ago. And from what I read, they will keep the 8300 unchanged, even after T-mobile comes out with the refined and updated 8320. And clearly, the 8830 is an evolution from the 8800. If there is some commercial logic here, I haven't figured it out. Cheers.
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Old 07-16-2007, 09:52 PM   #82 (permalink)
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Unfortunately, with corporations I don't always know that "logic" is the word. I don't know for a fact the answer to your question, but knowing what I do know it's probably a money issue.

They want to be the first to market with the product and catch all the people who will switch just for a device and keep their current customers from switching to get it elsewhere (we are a fickle lot, we Americans/cellphone buyers). So, they've now invested money in that device even though a more refined version will be out at a later time, but they were first to have it and getting the newer version would, i'm sure, cost more money and that hurts the bottom line.

Again, this is just my silly ol' deductive reasoning and i've not been called sherlock holmes lately so I could be wrong.
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Old 07-17-2007, 08:58 AM   #83 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by birdiebo View Post
A few comments after 48 hours with the 8830 on Sprint. So far the service itself has been surprisingly good, even going through rural CO. The device is clearly a refinement and improvement over the ATT and Verizon versions. The keyboard is not an issue for me; it's as easy as the 8700. Telephone quality is excellent...better than my Moto 815 on Verizon. And now a question for the more knowledgeable folks on this Forum: Why do the carriers stick with the original versions of their hardware? ATT is still selling the same 8700C I got from Cingular almost 20 months ago. And from what I read, they will keep the 8300 unchanged, even after T-mobile comes out with the refined and updated 8320. And clearly, the 8830 is an evolution from the 8800. If there is some commercial logic here, I haven't figured it out. Cheers.
Companies are always interested in customer who will switch for a new phone or feature. Surprisingly, that number is quite small, and and while each carrier loves to get them, they know that in a year or so when someone else comes out with the latest and greatest, those customers are likely to switch again (wireless number portability probably started this trend).

Carriers are much more interested in the core of customers they've had for a long time. Some of the subsidies on the new devices are pretty steep, so a carrier needs to have a customer for a few years to actually start making money off of them.

Though Sprint and/or Nextel branded BlackBerries will likely continue to appear, the 8830 may be the workhorse for a few years.

With TMobile set to launch a wi-fi capable device, other carriers won't be far behind. I work from my home alot, and my wi-fi connection is much more reliable than my coverage (I live at the bottom of a steep hill, and while my coverage is ok, it's not as strong as the signal from my wireless router!). I'll take a serious look at the first wi-fi BlackBerry Sprint releases, but for now I'm enjoying the 8830.
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