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-   -   What all can I do with Linux? (http://www.blackberryforums.com/linux-users-corner/115927-what-all-can-i-do-linux.html)

Captain_Juno 02-03-2008 02:15 PM

What all can I do with Linux?
 
I'm still playing around with livecd's, but if I can get it all figured out, I'd like to make it my main os, at least have a dual boot. Anyways, what I mostly use my pc for is MS Office (I need to be able to type something at home and somewhere else with the same program or .doc), internet, limewire or other p2p, torrents, blackberry, steam and other games, and a media player. I know wine can make some of this compatiable but how successful do you think I'd be trying to run this stuff?

LunkHead 02-03-2008 03:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain_Juno (Post 821057)
I'm still playing around with livecd's, but if I can get it all figured out, I'd like to make it my main os, at least have a dual boot. Anyways, what I mostly use my pc for is MS Office (I need to be able to type something at home and somewhere else with the same program or .doc), internet, limewire or other p2p, torrents, blackberry, steam and other games, and a media player. I know wine can make some of this compatiable but how successful do you think I'd be trying to run this stuff?

Linux has an equivalent to just about every Windows application... For instance:

Microsoft Office (word, excel, powerpoint) is Open Office in Linux.... Open Office can open any document created in MS Office...

Limewire / Frostwire is available for Linux

Firefox (inernet) and Thunderbird or Evolution (email) are used in gnome

Pleanty of media players are available for Linux. Totem, Mplayer ect..... A ton of options out there...

Are you talking high end games? If so, many do not play well with Linux....

I have never seen the need for wine, but it can be used to run some MS applications.... Another option is to run CrossOver Linux....

Hope this helped....

Kris

Captain_Juno 02-03-2008 03:44 PM

Yes, this did, thank you. I noticed after playing around that documents and pdf's that I had already saved on my computer when I was in xp could be opened in Linux as if I had created them there. So cool! And, yes, I did mean high end games. I'm a big gamer so I might have a problem with that but I know there's a way to somehow play CS:S on Linux so that's good.

Captain_Juno 02-03-2008 04:26 PM

If I already have Windows XP installed on my drive without partitioning, can I still install mint somehow without having to clean my hd?

livinginx 02-03-2008 05:20 PM

As far as gaming goes, I used to play CS 1.6 through WINE. It wasn't as good as on Windows, but at least for starting out I would reccomend dual-booting.

You don't have to clean your hard drive. If you have enough free-space, you can resize the one big partition into a total of three (minimum you would need for Windows and Linux to play nicely.)

There are multiple products out there that will allow you do that, but it isn't the safest way to get things done. It works well the majority of the time though.

infinite1der 02-04-2008 04:27 PM

I have been playing Steam games from CS:S -> HL2 (including TF2) under WINE with no issues. Keep in mind that it take some time to tweak WINE to be a well oiled machine, but it can be done. There are PLENTY of howtos and FAQs around.

--JamesT

jsculley 02-04-2008 06:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain_Juno (Post 821122)
And, yes, I did mean high end games. I'm a big gamer so I might have a problem with that but I know there's a way to somehow play CS:S on Linux so that's good.

Mandriva Linux, the distribution I use, has a Powerpack version which is reasonably priced, and includes Cedega, which allows you to play various games on your Linux machine:

Mandriva Linux Powerpack | Mandriva

I haven't tried Cedega, but it may be an option for you.

Jim S.

LunkHead 02-04-2008 07:36 PM

I will refrain from nasty comments about Mandriva...........

Linux is suppose to be open source and free.... I'd never recommend a distro that charges a single cent, so they are off my list..........

Kris

infinite1der 02-04-2008 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsculley (Post 822408)
I haven't tried Cedega, but it may be an option for you.

Jim S.

I used Cedega back when it was referred to as winex (followed by Transgaming). Basically, any games that required DirectX were limited to the Transgaming branch of WINE. That is until fairly recently (about the time of the name change to cedega). WINE was able to add in the DirectX capability.

Essentially, you're paying for support with Cedega, which was generally good. But, if you know what you're doing and what to look for, the developers for WINE are very willing to help you out.

--JamesT

jsculley 02-05-2008 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LunkHead (Post 822507)
I will refrain from nasty comments about Mandriva...........

Linux is suppose to be open source and free.... I'd never recommend a distro that charges a single cent, so they are off my list..........

Kris

There is still the free Mandriva distribution:

Download | Mandriva

The Powerpack subscription gives you early access to new releases, some addons that would cost you otherwise (such as Cedega) and some proprietary drivers (i.e. nvidia) that cannot be included in the free distribution due to GPL restrictions.

They aren't restricting the free nature of Linux in any way.

Jim S.

rivviepop 02-05-2008 07:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsculley (Post 823513)
They aren't restricting the free nature of Linux in any way.

I run a *lot* of servers and other systems with various Linux distros (it's my job - systems engineer) and I have one production machine running Mandrake/Mandriva. I'll never touch this operating system again, the underpinnings are really screwed up and overly complicated, worse than Debian used to be back in the day. It was the only option for this particular server at the time, and we regret ever giving in and accepting it.

$0.02 US.

jonabyte 02-08-2008 07:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain_Juno (Post 821180)
If I already have Windows XP installed on my drive without partitioning, can I still install mint somehow without having to clean my hd?

I am not that familiar with Mint, but most Linux versions allow the user to partition the hd during the installation.
Although, I have found installing a second hd much easier and safer in case you mess up, you still have a working os to use.

Captain_Juno 02-08-2008 11:31 AM

I actually have it working now. I repartitioned with Mint's installer (with a lot of help off the mint forums) and now am dual-booting with that and xp.

blakeatl 02-08-2008 01:59 PM

I installed PCLinuxOS 2007 with such little hassle that I feel like a pro. I learned a lot using Ubuntu from the Edgy days ( long time :smile: ). I am really enjoying this flavor based off of Mandriva and would recommend it to anyone.

JDaniels 02-08-2008 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LunkHead (Post 822507)
I will refrain from nasty comments about Mandriva...........

Linux is suppose to be open source and free.... I'd never recommend a distro that charges a single cent, so they are off my list..........

Kris

Open source is free, but not always in price. Here is the definition quoted from the GNU Project: The Free Software Definition - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
Quote:

Free software is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of free as in free speech, not as in free beer.

Free software is a matter of the users' freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. More precisely, it refers to four kinds of freedom, for the users of the software:

* The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).
* The freedom to study how the program works, and adapt it to your needs (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
* The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).
* The freedom to improve the program, and release your improvements to the public, so that the whole community benefits (freedom 3). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

LunkHead 02-08-2008 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDaniels (Post 827635)
Open source is free, but not always in price. Here is the definition quoted from the GNU Project: The Free Software Definition - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)

Quote all you want, the bottom line is that any distro that charges is a Microsoft wannabe in my book.... I think my opinion is shared by a vast majority of the Linux / Unix community......... My .02 worth on the matter....

:)

Kris

Fiyawerx 02-20-2008 02:59 PM

Re: Linux Alternatives
 
Check out The Linux Alternative Project - linuxalt.com for a nice list of Linux alternatives to windows software, too

rexxxlo 07-08-2008 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LunkHead (Post 822507)
I will refrain from nasty comments about Mandriva...........

Linux is suppose to be open source and free.... I'd never recommend a distro that charges a single cent, so they are off my list..........

Kris

ill agree on this one free is the only way


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